Tuesday, April 7, 2020
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Oregon reports four COVID-19 deaths, 49 new cases

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COVID-19

COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 33, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 1,181. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (6), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (11). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 30th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 31st COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 5 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 32nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 2 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 33rd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 6 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

New weekly report on COVID-19 cases in Oregon

Starting today, OHA will begin posting a weekly report that represents a snapshot of COVID-19 risk factors, clinical and demographic characteristics, and includes data on cases with pending investigations. You can review the report here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Otis armed robbery fugitive in custody after high-speed chase

Otis Robbery

Wanted fugitive Jacob Leeland Lunstedt was taken into custody today after a tip to Salem Police led to his capture by local law enforcement after a high-speed chase on Forest Service Road 1726.

Jacob Leeland Lunstedt

Lunstedt was wanted and considered armed and dangerous for a robbery that took place March 30 in Otis.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE

This morning at 10 a.m. the Salem Police Department was notified that Lundstedt was seen driving a 2020 Nissan Altima and possibly headed to Lincoln County.

At  approximately 1:20 p.m. Lincoln City Police located Lunstedt driving west on Highway 18. Officers and detectives in unmarked cars followed him onto East Devils Lake Road but Lunstedt realized he had a tail and took off up U.S. Forest Service Road 1726 with officers in hot pursuit.

The chase went on for 10 miles at 30-40 mph on 1726 — a road full of bumps, ruts and gravel — until Lunstedt drove over spike strips deployed by Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Zachary Dowty at the intersection of N. Bear Creek Road in Otis.

Lunstedt drove for another quarter-mile on three flat tires before finally coming to a stop.

He was taken into custody and transported to the Lincoln County Jail on charges related to the armed robbery, a prior unrelated felony warrant and additional charges related to the pursuit.

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the citizens who provided numerous tips to law enforcement agencies regarding Jacob Lunstedt. The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the City of Salem Police Department, and the City of Lincoln City Police Department. 

Child care openings available to essential workers

Samaritan Early Learning Center in Lincoln City has been approved by the state to provide emergency child care for a prioritized group of essential workers. That group is defined as health care professionals, first responders, emergency workers, critical operations staff and essential personnel, and other individuals working outside of the home.

Under the Governor’s Executive Order on March 24, child care facilities may remain open if they submit an application to provide Emergency Child Care and are approved by the Office of Child Care. Samaritan Early Learning Center, located on the campus of Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital, made its application and began offering emergency child care on April 6 for infants and children ages 6 weeks to 12 years.

Openings are still available. To summarize the service:

  • Care will be limited to the children of essential health care workers only.
  • Hours of operations are 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
  • Financial support may be available to qualifying families.
  • Enrolled children will be screened for symptoms daily (for example, coughing or fever) and will be excluded if they show symptoms or are potentially infected. This is necessary to maintain services for all families.
  • If an enrolled child begins showing symptoms or becomes ill, their family will be asked to return immediately to pick up the child to enable services to continue for others.

For complete information and application forms, call SELC Director Barbara Dougherty at 514-994-4208 or send an email to [email protected]

Reporter rides bike in Lincoln City, takes pictures

I rode my bike through the seven miles that is Lincoln City Monday and took some pictures along the way.

The beach at D River Wayside was deserted. It’s for the birds right now.

A bit of good news. The Pacific Ocean is still there.

All the birds were grouped together, perhaps because of a lack of humans on a sunny day?

Construction is chugging along at City Hall. They appear to be getting a lot of work done.

Rite-Aid after an officer-involved shooting. There were two holes in the front of the building and two windows were boarded up.

Bear Valley Nursery has a COVID-19-era sign up.

Other businesses have also stepped up their signage.

Safeway’s parking lot. Shoppers were coming out with some pretty full carts.

Most people in Lincoln City were wearing masks. Even ones in cars driving down the road.

Definitely saw social distancing in Lincoln City today.

Stay safe everyone.

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 69 new cases

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COVID-19

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 26 to 27, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon’s 27th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 2, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, in her residence. It is unknown at this time if she had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 69 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today.

The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (3), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (2), Marion (10), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (12), Yamhill (3).

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon reports four new COVID-19 deaths, 100 new cases

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COVID-19

COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 22 to 26, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 100 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 999. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties:

Benton (2), Clackamas (12), Columbia (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (2), Jackson (6), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (3), Marion (10), Multnomah (34), Polk (2), and Washington (19).

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 23rd COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 24th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24, 2020, and died on April 3, 2020, at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 25th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 26th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 23, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020, at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Coalition of state agencies ask for voluntary hold on burning

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No burning Lincoln County

In response to the “Stay Home, Save Lives” Executive Order to reduce the effects of the COVID-19 virus, a coalition of Oregon state agencies are asking Oregonians to voluntarily refrain from conducting outdoor burning.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office (OSFM), Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA), and Oregon Health Authority (OHA) recognize that many Oregonians use fire as a necessary tool to manage their lands, including industrial forest landowners, farmers, small woodland owners, and rural residents. However, it’s important to weigh possible effects on the wider community before choosing to burn. Please be a good neighbor. Smoke from fires during the current pandemic may result in the following negative consequences for the public and first responders:

  • Smoke inhalation can cause upper respiratory symptoms, which could be incorrectly attributed to COVID-19, leading to unnecessary testing or self-isolation.
  • Exposure to smoke and other forms of air pollution can increase the risk of contracting infectious respiratory disease such as COVID-19, increase the severity of existing respiratory infections, and worsen underlying chronic respiratory conditions.
  • There is a severe shortage of personal protective equipment to reduce smoke exposure at this time.
  • First responders and other emergency services are operating at a reduced capacity and have limited resources to respond to out-of-control burns.

COVID-19 affects the respiratory system. Fever, cough and difficulty breathing are the most common symptoms. While some people with COVID-19 are hospitalized, most patients recover at home, where smoke from a nearby outdoor burn could worsen their condition. To avoid additional health impacts, all people in Oregon are asked to voluntarily refrain from conducting outdoor burning activities until further notice.

Burning that can be delayed includes:

  • Debris burning around one’s property
  • Burn barrels
  • Industrial burning
  • Slash and forest burning
  • Agricultural burning that would impact neighbors and can be delayed

Local officials may already have prohibited outdoor burning in your area. If you must conduct outdoor burning, please first check with your local fire agency to see if outdoor burning is still allowed. If it is, please follow best burn practices, which can be found on the website of the Office of the State Fire Marshall.

DEQ, ODF, OSFM, and ODA encourage the public to use the following alternatives to burning when available:

  • Recycle paper products when possible
  • Compost or chip yard debris on site
  • Haul to a yard debris composting or recycling site
  • Reuse old lumber

For more information, visit:

ODF – https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Fire/pages/Burn.aspx

DEQ – https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/Burning.aspx

ODA – https://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/NaturalResources/Pages/Burning.aspx

OHA COVID-19 website – https://govstatus.egov.com/OR-OHA-COVID-19

This is a rapidly evolving situation. The latest COVID-19 response and protocols information is available at the Oregon Health Authority | COVID 19 Updates webpage. Additional information can be found on the CDC website.

Lincoln County receives more high ratings for social distancing

COVID-19 Community Mobility Report for Oregon - March 29, 2020
COVID-19 Community Mobility Report for Oregon – March 29, 2020

 

Today, Google announced the release of its COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports that use data from their user’s smartphone location history, to compare how social distancing efforts are working.

Comparing all Oregon counties, Lincoln County (pop. 48,920) had the highest reduction (-59 percent) in user’s movements related to the workplace. Lincoln ranked second in park-related movement (-53 percent), fourth in “retail and recreation” movement (-62 percent) and fifth in “grocery & pharmacy” movement (-29 percent). Averaging these five categories, Lincoln County scored second overall with a -49 percent reduction. Clatsop County (pop. 39,182) received the top score with an average reduction of -51 percent.

Google compared movement from the past 48 to 72 hours, against a baseline from late January. Google said they are only using anonymized data from users who have turned on the Location History setting, which is off by default.

Other data mining companies are finding similar results. On Tuesday, Unacast gave Lincoln County an “A” rating for its social distancing efforts. While the rating slipped to “B” on Wednesday, it’s back to an “A” today. No other Oregon county currently has an “A” rating. Nationally, Unacast ranks Lincoln County 28th, beating out over 99 percent of the more than 3,000 counties in America.

“Data of this type has helped researchers look into predicting epidemics, plan urban and transit infrastructure, and understand people’s mobility and responses to conflict and natural disasters,” Google said.

Officers use deadly force in Lincoln City

Rite Aid Shooting
Lincoln City Police used deadly force Thursday night in front of Rite Aid

Lincoln City Police officers shot and killed a man late Thursday night who witnesses say was wielding a knife and “acting crazy.”

In a news release early Friday morning, Lincoln City Police said officers were involved in shooting a suspect who was rushed to Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital where lifesaving efforts were performed, but the person died from their wounds. Police officials said no officers were injured during the shooting.

According to multiple eyewitness accounts, a male was observed “acting crazy” and brandishing a knife, prompting calls to 911. When officers confronted him in front of Rite Aid, sources said the man failed to comply with the officers commands and multiple officers opened fire.

Witnesses said there were multiple gunshots. Some of the shots broke windows at the Rite-Aid store setting off multiple alarms.

The officers were put on paid administrative leave following standard protocol and Oregon State Police were called in and are leading the investigation with help from the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.

Homepage has reached out to the Oregon State Police and received a response from Captain Timothy Fox stating a news release was being worked on and would possibly be out later this afternoon after approval from the district attorney.

This is a developing story.

Fourth Lincoln County resident tests positive for COVID-19

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Covid-19 Lincoln County

Lincoln County Public Health announced today another positive case of COVID-19. The new case brings Lincoln County’s total to 4 confirmed cases.

This individual is in their 30s, had no known contact with a confirmed case, so the case is being investigated as a community-acquired case. The person is not hospitalized and is self-isolating per Public Health guidelines.

“We are receiving a lot of questions about why we are not releasing city specific information about cases and the main reason is for patient privacy. Beyond that, we realize there have been limitations with testing and that it is unlikely that everyone who has COVID-19 has been tested.” said Nicole Fields, Deputy Director of Public Health, “In order to best protect you and your loved ones, please ask yourself, ‘What would I do differently if I knew there was a case in my city?’  and then take those actions to keep yourself as safe as possible.”

The best way to protect yourself is to avoid exposure to the virus. This is why social distancing and staying at home as much as possible is crucial at this time. For the latest information, guidelines, and resources for those affected, go to Lincoln County’s website www.co.lincoln.or.us/covid or call 541-265-0621.

If you have symptoms and think you need testing, contact your doctor. Testing is done at providers’ discretion and does not require approval from public health. As more testing is done, we expect to find more cases in the community. You can find up-to-date numbers on cases of COVID-19 in Oregon at healthoregon.org/coronavirus .

Stay informed

Global Response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.