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Oregon FBI goes virtual with ‘Teen Series’

FBI Portland Teen Series

Portland’s FBI field office has launched an online learning experience for students designed to let them explore the world of law enforcement.

Session One: “Teens: Avoiding Risks of Online Sexual Exploitation,” took place Wednesday, July 8, with students from various state high schools attending. The session covered how to avoid online sexual exploitation.

FBI Teen Series

Over the next three weeks teens will learn about the life of an FBI agent, leadership and how to become a positive role model in their community.

The “FBI Virtual Teen Series” is open to Oregon high school students who register via email and have a student email account. Once signed up, students can participate in three remaining sessions:

  • Session Two: Chasing the Dragon – The Life of and Opiate Addict 
    • Date: Wednesday, July 15, 2020
    • Time: 1 – 2 p.m.
  • Session Three: Life as an FBI Agent 
    • Date: Wednesday, July 22, 2020
    • Time: 1 – 2 p.m.
  • Session Four: Intelligence – Identifying and Prioritizing Today’s Threats 
    • Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2020
    • Time: 1 – 2 p.m.

FBI officials said space is limited.

Lincoln City Police officers arrest identity theft suspects

Lincoln City identity theft

Lincoln City Police Officer Hayden Tolzman responded to a report of possible identity theft by a male and female at the Shearwater Inn, Sunday, July 5, that led to a foot chase, taser deployment and a stolen gun.

After locating the male suspect one block north of the Shearwater Inn, Tolzman asked him to stop, but the man took off on foot. As the chase unfolded north through the Sea Gypsy Motel parking lot, the male suspect dropped a handgun from his waistband and continued to flee from the pursuing officer. Tolzman caught up with him and a fight ensued.

Lincoln City Police Hayden Tolzman
Lincoln City Police Officer Hayden Tolzman

A struggle took place in the parking lot, with the suspect swinging a fist at Tolzman’s head — missing — and allowing the officer to try and fire his taser. The suspect’s girlfriend punched the taser out of Tolzman’s hands and struck him in the chest.

Fellow officer Preston Craig arrived as backup, buying Tolzman time to redeploy his taser successfully on the man who continued to disobey repeated commands. The officers took him into custody without serious injury.

Lincoln City Police Officer Preston Craig
Lincoln City Police Officer Preston Craig

The male suspect, refusing to identify himself, was later identified as Daniel Loyd Howton Jr., 40, of Portland. Howton had warrants for his arrest out of Marion and Multnomah Counties.

The girlfriend was identified as Emily Ruth Huse, 28, of Vancouver, Wash.

During the investigation, Lincoln City Police learned the handgun dropped by Howton was reported as stolen from Portland in March.

Howton was taken to the Lincoln County Jail for felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm, attempted assault on a police officer, attempted unlawful use of a weapon, identity theft, interfering with police, disorderly conduct, harassment and the two warrants. His bail was set at $262,500.00.

Huse was lodged at the Lincoln City Police Department for criminal possession of a forged instrument. Charges are pending for interfering with the apprehension of Howton. The Lincoln County Jail denied entry to Huse due to COVID-19 policy, and she was issued a criminal citation and released Sunday evening.

The Lincoln City Police Department would like to thank the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, PacWest Medical and North Lincoln Fire for their assistance during this incident.

Most restaurants and bars in Oregon following COVID-19 requirements

bars oregon COVID-19

Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) inspectors swept across Oregon over the Fourth of July weekend and checked 800 businesses for compliance with social distancing requirements issued by Governor Kate Brown.

Sixteen OLCC officials conducted the compliance checks on July 3, 13 on July 4 and 13 on July 5. The OLCC says on average, it has eight inspectors statewide doing compliance checks at bars and restaurants.

Inspectors found significant compliance with social distancing and face covering requirements for most of Oregon, but in some parts of the state, inspectors reported some cases of clear disregard for social distancing requirements. Problems were found in Bend’s downtown district, portions of Josephine County and in the Newport area where inspectors found licensees violating state statutes or OLCC rules. OLCC will be issuing administrative violations for those businesses.

No information could be given on who the businesses were as inspectors are still writing reports and the process takes time. According to OLCC officials, additional news releases would be forthcoming.

The OLCC said they are continuing their investigations of licensees found to be out of compliance and will be taking administrative actions on those alleged to have violated state law and OLCC rules. Once reports have been completed, the cases will be forwarded to OSHA for action.

Biplane soars through space and time

Pilot Dana Andersen, who began flying as a youngster from a skinny, beachside airstrip in his hometown of Pacific City, rebuilt the 1929 Travel Air he uses to carry carry sightseers over Lincoln County. (Photo by Rick Beasley)
Pilot Dana Andersen, who began flying as a youngster from a skinny, beachside airstrip in his hometown of Pacific City, rebuilt the 1929 Travel Air he uses to carry carry sightseers over Lincoln County. (Photo by Rick Beasley)

KERNVILLE — In the skies over Depoe Bay and Lincoln City, a modern-day barnstormer in an open-cockpit biplane is giving passengers a journey through space and time seldom found at the soulless tarmacs of modern airports.

On the wings of a 91-year-old aircraft, begoggled sightseers are awed by the secret airborne wonders of the Oregon coast: wave-swept headlands remote as the back side of the moon, seabirds that join in formation and the spectacle of gray whales feeding in a shallow bay.

The real star of the aerial expedition, however, is a 1929 Travel Air B-4000 that once transported G-men at record speeds during the Prohibition era.

The sleek lines and other ideas borrowed from WW1 fighters made the 1929 Travel Air a marvel of speed and reliability for its day. (Photo by Rick Beasley)
The sleek lines and other ideas borrowed from WW1 fighters made the 1929 Travel Air a marvel of speed and reliability for its day. (Photo by Rick Beasley)

“When they said it was a 1929 airplane, I just about had heart failure — I don’t even like old cars,” chuckled Christina Grow of Beaverton after an exciting — but hardly blistering — 80-mph flyover of Cascade Head. “It was amazing, with the wind and the sound and smell of the engine. You’re really in the moment.”

Dana Andersen, a commercial pilot and certified aviation mechanic, discovered the airplane in 1999 in a hangar at Evergreen Airport in Vancouver, Wash.

“It hadn’t flown since 1939,” recalled Andersen, who began flying airplanes “as a kid” at a beachside airport in his hometown of Pacific City. “Its owner brought it back from the East Coast and had been tinkering with it for 20 years, but never got it flying.”

To pilots everywhere, the unmistakable ‘throb-and-chop’ sound of a radial engine and its six-foot prop reverberates with aviation history. Startled visitors on the boardwalk at Depoe Bay shade their eyes and crane their necks at the unusual racket.

“It cost $10,000 off the factory line at a time when you could buy a new car for $600,” Andersen said of the cloth-covered aircraft, whose wire-rigged wings “sing” in flight. “It was the state of the art in its day for luxury airplane travel.”

The aircraft bears the stamp of aviation-design legends Lloyd Stearman, Clyde Cessna and Walter Beech, who incorporated ideas from the best military planes of World War I into the Travel Air. It was nicknamed “The Wichita Fokker” for its similarities with a German fighter.

Tammy Andersen, wife and partner at Northwest Plane Rides, adjusts the seat belts for a couple of clients who were awestruck by the antique bi-plane parked at Siletz Bay State Airport. (Photo by Rick Beasley)
Tammy Andersen, wife and partner at Northwest Plane Rides, adjusts the seat belts for a couple of clients who were awestruck by the antique bi-plane parked at Siletz Bay State Airport. (Photo by Rick Beasley)

Logbooks revealed the airplane, with room for two passengers in front and a pilot in the rear cockpit, was first owned by the U.S. Commerce Dept. and was used to transport top government officials, including revenuers and F.B.I. agents.

“It even had a siren on it,” Andersen marveled. “It’s fun to think it was used to chase bootleggers.”

Andersen, 56, restored the airplane to like-new condition and has been barnstorming the Oregon coast for the last 13 years at busy tourist destinations such as Tillamook, Newport and Siletz Bay, a bucolic airfield three miles north of Depoe Bay with no tower and a single windsock to guide pilots on landings.

“It’s the perfect airport for us,” reflected Andersen, who the found runway politics too tumultuous at Tillamook and the flying weather spotty in Newport. “Every day is flyable. At Newport, the fog creeps up from the gullies and the airport shuts down.”

Powered by a 225-horsepower Lycoming engine, the Travel Air has a top speed of 130 mph but cruises at a leisurely 80 on trips to Depoe Bay, Seal Rock or Sand Lake. Dropping like an elevator on approach, the airplane lands at a gentle 52 mph.

Pilot Dana Anderson slips into the wind on approach to Siletz Bay State Airport, five miles south of Lincoln City
Pilot Dana Anderson slips into the wind on approach to Siletz Bay State Airport, five miles south of Lincoln City

“There’s no autopilot or fly-by-wire,” Andersen observed. “A plane like this is good exercise for a pilot.”

Northwest Plane Rides operates daily now until mid-September from the state airport adjacent to Salishan Golf Course. For information or reservations, call 503-701-7590 or visit the web site, nwplanerides.com.

DA says Clark County Seven did not commit bias crime

Clark County Lincoln City

Seven Clark County men were recently arrested in Lincoln City for illegal fireworks, yelling racial slurs and using Nazi salutes to harass a black family on Independence Day, prompting the Lincoln County District Attorney to issue a statement about the incident.

Jonathan Cable, the current district attorney for Lincoln County, said his office had been in contact with Lincoln City Police officers the night it occurred and has been in constant contact with the victims.

Cable said he would file the appropriate charges that could be proved under the law and explained why this instance was not a bias crime (ORS 166.155 or 166.165) because it did not involve offensive physical contact, destruction of property or threat of physical injury.

The district attorney said the quick intervention of the Lincoln City Police prevented those things from occurring.

“Unfortunately, using racist or derogatory language is not in itself criminal under Oregon law,” Cable said.

Cable said it should be noted that Lincoln City Police were cheered and applauded by numerous witnesses and did a great job keeping the victims safe.

The suspects are not in custody due to Lincoln County Jail’s policy related to COVID-19, which has limited the list of charges for which a suspect can be incarcerated.

“The behavior alleged will not be tolerated in this community and should not be anywhere,” Cable said.

Previous coverage:

Seven Clark County men arrested for harassment in Lincoln City

 

Father and son dispute leads to attempted murder charges

Brandy Leonard
Brandy Leonard II

Oregon State Police say a son used his truck as a weapon against his father after an altercation while driving on Independence Day, nine miles east of Waldport.

Trooper David Wertz said he was dispatched to investigate a vehicle versus pedestrian crash around 9:30 p.m. when he made contact with two men, one of whom had life threatening injuries and needed to be transported by Life Flight to Sacred Heart Riverbend Hospital in Springfield.

Brandy Collins Leonard II, 26, of Waldport, admitted to Wertz he was the driver of a Chevy Silverado truck and he and the victim were father and son. Further investigation by Wertz revealed the two had a fight while driving and the son stopped the vehicle to allow his father, Brandy Collins Leonard, 47, of Toledo, to exit. Once the father was outside, the son struck him with the vehicle. The son then exited the truck and continued to assault his father.

Wertz said the son was exhibiting signs of alcohol impairment and performed DUII tests poorly.

Brandy Leonard II was taken into custody and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail where he faces charges of attempted murder, assault and DUII. His bail is set at $650,000.

The condition of the father, Brandy Collins Leonard, is unknown at this time. According to Sacred Heart medical staff, he is not in their system as of 2 p.m. July 6.

K9 Bonni captures hit and run suspect in Newport

K9 Bonni
K9 Bonni

Lincoln County Sheriff K9 Bonni and her handler, Deputy Zach Akin, located and apprehended a man alleged to be the perpetrator of a hit and run on Yaquina Bay Bridge Saturday, July 4.

Multiple law enforcement agencies responded to a hit and run vehicle accident near the north end of Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport. 911 callers said a maroon Chevy pickup had struck multiple vehicles and injured two juveniles and an adult. Bystanders observed a man running from one of the vehicles into nearby dense foliage.

K9 Bonni successfully tracked, located and apprehended Dylan A. Johnston, 26, of Toledo.

Johnston was transported to Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital to be treated for minor injuries sustained during the K9 apprehension.

Johnston faces charges of assault, hit and run, assault on a public safety officer, possession of a concealed weapon and DUII. His bail was set at $330,000.

Newport Police Department and Oregon State Police assisted.

 

‘Lil Wes’ is back in Lincoln City and has put cancer in remission

Wesley Culver Lincoln City Oregon
Lincoln City’s Wesley Allen Michael Culver

Wesley Allen Michael Culver said he went into shock when he got the news that he had cancer on December 12, 2019 at just 14-years-old.

The now 15-year-old, soon to be Taft High Sophomore was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a mutation that affects 20-30 percent of AML patients.

“I thought I just had a cold or something. I didn’t know I was really sick,” he said.

The FLT3 mutation is a gene change in leukemia cells people with AML can have. It encourages the growth of too many abnormal leukemia cells.

Advancements in cancer treatments and doctors’ understanding of the disease have made it so more people survive the condition each year, and Wesley is part of that group.

Wesley received treatments at Doernbecher and Randall Children’s Hospitals in Portland.

“The staffs there are amazing,” he said. “All the nurses knew me and called me by name. They took good care of me.”

The teen has been through multiple bone marrow checks and the results have been coming back with no detectable cancer but he says he has another biopsy July 23 and is recovering at home after eight months in the hospitals. He is in remission and will be considered cancer free after five years.

Wesley’s cancer treatments included four rounds of chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant.

“The first round of chemo was the hardest,” Wesley says. “I was really sick. Constantly puking. There were a few times I felt like I was going to die. Completely normal one second and the next I had a 104.5 fever. I will never forget that.”

He made it through three more rounds of chemotherapy and was matched with a donor for a bone marrow transplant. Wesley said he might meet his donor after one year, if the person wants to.

Wesley says one thing in particular stood out during his stay in the hospitals. He said he got to meet a “really cool guy” named Cameron who did music therapy with him. Cameron would play guitar and sometimes the pair would just talk. The two hit it off and now they Zoom call each other twice a week.

Wesley said he feels like “a baby” after leaving the hospital and coming home to Lincoln City.

From left, Alyssa, Nichole, Wesley and Wesley

“I can’t really do much right now. I’m still taking this medicine from my bone marrow transplant and I have to heal right and everything needs to go smooth.”

Nichole Trickler, Wesley’s mother was instrumental in keeping Wesley’s spirits up, he says.

“She would get my sick bags when I didn’t feel good and get me up out of bed and take me on walks. I couldn’t have done this without her and our bond has grown much stronger.”

Wesley said she would get takeout when the hospital food was “less than desirable.”

“She would do seriously anything for me. Her and I got through this together,” he said.

His mom set up a Facebook group called Wesley Allen Michael’s Journey. It has live videos and supportive comments from the community.

Lincoln City showed its support for the local teen’s return with businesses putting up signs saying “Welcome Home” and friends yelling at the family’s vehicle as it drove through town.

Welcome home Wesley Culver

Wesley has been playing video games because he loves to do it and said they really helped him while he was in the hospital. You can group up with him on Xbox under “Smoshy7685” and on Nintendo Switch with “weswillkill.”

Wesley’s father, also named Wesley Culver, helped him through the process of fighting cancer by bringing him cookies when his son was not feeling good. He also shaved his longtime beard to make his son feel better.

“My dad brought his friend Mike with him which was nice because not many people came to visit me. I mean, a good handful did but they would only come once or twice. My dad and Mike came all the time.”

PRO TIP: If you see the two Culvers together, you can address the younger as “Lil Wes.”

“I’d just like to say thank you to everyone in our community for all the support,” Big Wes said.

“I’m thankful for all the support from everyone,” Lil Wes said.

Future plans for Wesley are to get a job to pay back his parents for “raising him his whole life” and to go to college. He said he would like to be a pro gamer and develop video games and apps.

UPDATED: Seven Clark County men arrested for harassment in Lincoln City

beach Lincoln City racial

Update from Lincoln City Police Department 5:47 p.m. Tuesday, July 7:

At the time of the arrests, one of those in the group refused to identify himself. That subject was transported to the Lincoln County Jail and lodged there pending his identification.

Once the subject was down at the jail he was identified to be Oleg Saranchuk (45) of Clark County Washington. It was determined that due to a language barrier and some lack of cooperation the subject originally identified as Oleg Saranchuk (in the original mug shot photo spread) had been misidentified, and was in fact Andrey I. Leonchik (41) of Clark County, Washington. Both men were charged with the following crimes: Riot, Interfering with Police, Disorderly Conduct II, Harassment, Possession of Illegal Fireworks, and Offensive Littering. Andrey Leonchik was cited and released from the Lincoln City Police Department. Oleg Saranchuk was later released from the Lincoln County Jail.

The case investigation is being referred to the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office for further review and determination of charges.

—————————————————–

Seven Clark County, Wash. men were arrested on Independence Day by Lincoln City Police for harassing a black family, launching illegal fireworks and causing a disturbance on the beach in front of Inn at Spanish Head.

According to police officials, at 9:33 p.m. officers were dispatched to a group of people launching illegal fireworks and causing a disturbance on the beach. The first officers arrived in an all terrain vehicle and were surrounded by a group of about 10 people who began taunting and challenging the officers as they seized illegal fireworks.

Several officers arrived as backup and learned the group causing the disturbance was responsible for yelling racial slurs and using Nazi salutes towards a black family who said they felt intimidated by the men. Lincoln City Police say they formed a line between the white Clark County men and the black family, allowing them to safely leave the beach and return to their room. During this time the men continued to shoot illegal aerial fireworks and taunt the officers, “trying to challenge them to fight.”

Several more officers arrived and police moved in on the highly intoxicated confrontational group and placed them under arrest for a variety of criminal charges.

Gennadiy Kachankov (30), Antoliy Kachankov (28), Andrey Zaytsev (28), Oleg Saranchuk (45), Ruslan Tkachenko (22), all of Clark County Wash., were charged with the following crimes:

  • Riot
  • Interfering with police
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Harassment
  • Possession of illegal fireworks
  • Offensive Littering

They men were cited and later released.

An additional male, who refused to identify himself and who had no identification on his person, was transported to the Lincoln County Jail for fingerprint identification and charged with the above listed crimes. Yuriy Kachankov, 30, of Clark County, was also charged with the above along with Resisting arrest. He was cited and later released.

Lincoln City Police was assisted by Toledo Police Department and Lincoln County Parole and Probation.

Lincoln County reports fourth local COVID-19 death

Covid-19 Lincoln County

A 96-year-old woman is Lincoln County’s fourth reported local COVID-19 related death. She died July 2 at her residence and had underlying medical conditions.

Public Health also announced one new case of COVID-19 today. This brings the current count to 346 cases.

Lincoln County has many resources that can help residents or visitors of any background and preferred language. If you experience a medical emergency call 911 immediately. For less urgent care, contact the Lincoln Community Health Center or Samaritan Health. Contact information listed below.

There are three situations where you must quarantine for 14 days.  We ask that workplaces support employees who are required to quarantine and not ask them to go to work in these situations.  Supports are in place for people who must isolate, and we will be reaching out to all known close contacts and confirmed cases.  If you have questions about this, please contact our call center at 541-265-0621 or email [email protected]

The three situations where people need to self-isolate and quarantine are:

  1. Confirmed COVID-19 test
  2. Close contact of positive case (within six feet for over 15 minutes)
  3. Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19. These symptoms include cough, chills, fever, sore throat, muscle pain, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, new loss of sense of taste or smell.  New symptoms recently announced include loss of appetite, abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting.

Below is a description of quarantine and isolation guidelines for confirmed positive COVID-19 cases and close contacts. According to the Oregon Health Authority, testing above and beyond this guidance is neither recommended nor should it be required. That is, once a case has met criteria for discontinuation of isolation, or a contact has completed their quarantine period, they should not be required to test negative before returning to work. 

HOW LONG TO QUARANTINE OR ISOLATE
CLOSE CONTACT

Quarantine yourself if you have had close contact with a positive case

IF NO SYMPTOMS

Quarantine for 14 days

IF SYMPTOMS

Quarantine for 14 days. If symptoms develop, get tested.

 

 

POSITIVE CASES

Isolate away from others in your

home who may be quarantined

IF NO SYMPTOMS

Isolate for 10 days from date tested

IF SYMPTOMS

Isolate for 10 days after onset and 3 days after symptoms stop

Once close contacts and positive cases meet the criteria for discontinuation of quarantine and isolation, they may return to their regular lives. Additional testing is not recommended

Lincoln County staff and partners are making calls to close contacts of confirmed cases.   Some of these calls may look like they come from an unknown number.  If you don’t answer, they will leave a message.  Please call them back as soon as you can.

Local public and tribal health authorities will never ask for your social security number, credit card number, bank account or billing information, or immigration status. (Note: Information will not be shared with immigration authority or law enforcement. Getting tested or getting treatment for COVID-19 will not affect your ability to get permanent residency in the U.S.)

Additional details on how to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 novel coronavirus:

  • If you have had close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case:
    • Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet of a confirmed case for 15 minutes or longer. Start a 14-day quarantine immediately. This means staying at home or in your hotel/other living arrangements. This includes staying home from work and not going out to shop for supplies.
    • Someone from public health will reach out to you. Monitor your symptoms. Contact your doctor if you develop symptoms. If you need a physician, contact Samaritan or the Lincoln Community Health Center:
      • Samaritan Health Services – 855-543-2780.
      • Lincoln Community Health Center – 541-265-4947
    • If you aren’t sure if you have had close contact with a confirmed case:
      • Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet of a confirmed case for 15 minutes or longer. If this did not happen, then you do not need to quarantine, but you may want to limit your trips outside the home. Monitor your symptoms.
      • Contact your doctor if you develop symptoms. If you need a physician, contact Samaritan or the Lincoln Community Health Center:
        • Samaritan Health Services – 855-543-2780.
        • Lincoln Community Health Center – 541-265-4947
      • If you develop COVID-19 symptoms
        • Start a 14 day quarantine immediately. This means staying at home or in your hotel/other living arrangements. This includes staying home from work and not going out to shop for supplies.
        • Contact your doctor and let them know that you have COVID-19 symptoms. If you need a physician, contact Samaritan or the Lincoln Community Health Center:
          • Samaritan Health Services – 855-543-2780.
          • Lincoln Community Health Center – 541-265-4947
        • If you receive a negative COVID-19 test result after being asked to quarantine:
          • Continue to quarantine until your 14 days have passed. This includes staying home from work and the store.
          • Continue to monitor your symptoms and contact your doctor if you develop any. If you need a physician, contact Samaritan or the Lincoln Community Health Center:
            • Samaritan Health Services – 855-543-2780.
            • Lincoln Community Health Center – 541-265-4947

Anyone in Lincoln County that is confirmed to have COVID-19 or that has had close contact with a confirmed case will be receiving a letter from Public Health as proof to their employer excusing their absence from work. If you have COVID-19, have been exposed, or develop symptoms you need to quarantine immediately. It is of utmost importance that Lincoln County employers and occupants quarantine at the first sign of symptoms or suspected exposure.

For more information on contact tracing, please visit https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/hhs/page/contact-tracing

For more information on quarantine and self-isolation, please visit

https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/hhs/page/quarantine-and-isolation-information