Thursday, April 9, 2020

Siletz Tribal Council members elected

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From left. Reggie Butler Sr., Lillie Butler, Loraine Y. Butler, Robert Kentta, Angela Ramirez, Selene Rilatos, Sharon Edenfield, Bud Lane and Delores PigsleyLoraine Y. Butler, Robert Kentta and Selene Rilatos were elected to the Tribal Council of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Saturday, Feb 1.

Butler, of Siletz, and Kentta, of Logsden, were re-elected, while newcomer Rilatos, of Toledo, was elected with 268 votes.

The three will serve three year terms on the nine-member council with Reggie Butler Sr., Sharon Edenfield, Angela Ramirez — whose terms expire in 2021 — Lillie Butler, Alfred (Bud) Lane III,  and Delores Pigsley — whose terms expire in 2022.

Eight hundred twenty-two ballots were cast by Siletz Tribe members 18 and older. The Tribe has over 5,400 enrolled members.

The swearing-in ceremony for the newly elected council members took place Feb. 2. Officers are elected on an annual basis and those selected for 2020 include:

  • Delores Pigsley, chairman
  • Bud Lane, vice chairman
  • Sharon Edenfield, secretary
  • Robert Kentta, treasurer

Pigsley currently has served 34.5 years as Tribal chairman out of 41 years on the council, while Lillie Butler has served 28; Reggie Butler, 23; Bud Lane, 22; Robert Kentta and Loraine Butler, 15 each; Sharon Edenfield, nearly 10 years; Gloria Ingle, 6 years; and Angela Ramirez, 2 years.

The Siletz Tribe has spent the last 42 years rebuilding its government and economic structure. The signing of Public Law 95-195 in 1977, which restored government-to-government relations between the Siletz Tribe and the federal government, started this process. The Siletz Tribe was the second in the nation – and the first in Oregon – to achieve restoration.

The Siletz Tribe was among the first to become a self-governance Tribe, giving Tribal government more control over services provided to Tribal members. Under self-governance, the U.S. government provides general funding to the Tribe (rather than to specific programs), then Tribal employees and the Tribal Council decide how funds will be spent.

Significant Tribal accomplishments since Restoration include opening the original health clinic in 1991 and a new much larger clinic in 2010; building more than 150 homes and multiple dwellings for Tribal members, including 28 units at Neachesna Village in Lincoln City that have opened since 2009, 19 apartments in Siletz that opened in 2010 and 20 homes in the Tillamook subdivision in Siletz that have opened since 2013; completing the Siletz Dance House in 1996; opening the Tenas Illahee Childcare Center in 2003; opening the Tillicum Fitness Center and a new USDA food distribution warehouse in Siletz in 2008; and opening the Siletz Recreation Center in 2009.

Through its economic development division, the Siletz Tribal Business Corporation, the Tribe purchased the  Lincoln Shores office complex in Lincoln City in 2001 and opened the Siletz Gas & Mini-Mart in Siletz in 2004, the Logan Road RV Park in Lincoln City in 2004 and the Hee Hee Illahee RV Resort in Salem in 2006.

Tribal offices in Portland, Salem and Eugene are housed in Tribally owned buildings. The Eugene office moved to its current location in 2005, the Salem office did the same in 2006 and the Portland office moved to its current location in 2008.

The Tribe also played a lead role in opening the Siletz Valley School in 2003 and the Siletz Valley Early College Academy in 2006.

The Siletz Tribal Arts & Heritage Society (STAHS) was formed in 2013 as a nonprofit to enhance the Tribe’s ability to develop the Siletz Tribal Cultural Center. STAHS also helps the Tribe with acquiring object and archival collections.

Chinook Winds Casino in Lincoln City opened in 1995. In 2004, the Siletz Tribe purchased the former Shilo Inn adjacent to the casino and opened Chinook Winds Casino Resort. Chinook Winds Golf Resort opened in 2005 when the Tribe purchased the former Lakeside Golf and Fitness Center in Lincoln City.

The combination of Tribal employees and those at Chinook Winds Casino Resort has made the Siletz Tribe the largest employer in Lincoln County.

The Siletz Tribe has honored its tradition of sharing within the community by distributing more than $17.6 million through the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund and other Tribal resources. Chinook Winds has donated more than $6.5 million in cash and fund-raising items since 1995. It also provides in-kind donations of convention space for various fundraisers as well as technical support, advertising and manpower for events.

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This information was provided for dissemination to our readers and was edited to comply with Associated Press style and professional journalism standards by Homepage staff. Click on the author's name next to the VIA tag above for contact information.

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